“Fighting Merit Pay” Chapter from Educational Courage (by NYCoRE members) in Washington Post

“You Want to Pay Me for What?!?”: Resisting Merit Pay and the Business Model of Education is a chapter written by NYCoRE core members Sam Coleman and Edwin Mayorga for the book Educational Courage: Resisting the Ambush of Public Education .

Excerpts of the chapter were posted by Valerie Strauss of the Washington Post in “The Answer Sheet” blog. The chapter tells the story of how Sam Coleman came to recognize how corporate-based reform was affecting what he did in the classroom and how he stopped a standardized test score-based merit pay  program at his school.

Check out the post:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2012/11/22/a-story-of-educational-courage/

Find out more info about the book Educational Courage here

NYCoRE still has copies to sell at a reduced rate. If you’re interested email: edwin@nycore.org

NYCoRE sponsored Book Talk with Leigh Patel 12/16 3:00pm

 

Book Talk with Leigh Patel

Youth Held at the Border: Immigration, Education and the Politics of Inclusion
12/16/12
3:00pm-4:30pm
La Casa Azul Bookstore
143 East 103rd Street New York, NY 10029

Illegal. Undocumented. Remedial. DREAMers. All of these labels have been applied to immigrant youth. Using a combination of engaging narrative and rigorous analysis, this book explores how immigrant youth are included in, and excluded from, various sectors of American society, including education. Instead of the land of opportunity, immigrant youth often encounter myriad new borders long after their physical journey to the United States is over. With an intimate storytelling style, the author invites readers to rethink assumptions about immigrant youth and what their often liminal positions reveal about the politics of inclusion in America.

By sharing the narratives of young immigrants living at the intersections of cultures, languages, and traditions, author and professor Leigh Patel will engage the audience in understanding the complexity of the multiple borders. Young immigrants face borders not only across nations but in school, in families, in the workplace, and in the law. The talk and book, of the same title, will lift up the stories of individual immigrant youth to help readers see the patterns that make society a series of open doors for some and closed gates for others.

Lisa (Leigh) Patel is an associate professor of education at Boston College. She has been a journalist, a teacher, and astate-level policymaker. Visit her website at Lisapatel.org

Sponsored by The New York Collective of Radical Educators (NYCoRE), this event will also feature a performance by the Peace Poets.

Join Us!

Civil Rights Orgs File Complaint Over New York’s High Stakes Tests from In these Times (11.12.12)

 In These Times piece on Anti-high stakes testing work in NYC. Includes quotes from NYCoRE members Rosie Frascella and Wazina Zondon and the Movement of Rank and File Educators (MORE)

Civil Rights Orgs File Complaint Over New York’s High Stakes Tests
BY MICHELLE CHEN

Created by Jason Rondinelli (NYCoRE)

“Every year, New York City middle-schoolers subject themselves to a grueling academic ritual that could make or break their educational futures, or so they’re told. The 2.5-hour multiple-choice Specialized High School Admissions Test (SHSAT) serves as the sole gateway to a suite of elite public schools—particularly Bronx Science, Stuyvesant and Brooklyn Technical. The kids who make the cut tend to be disproportionately Asian and white; Latino and black students are vastly underrepresented.
Civil rights groups are now waging a legal challenge accusing New York City’s education authorities of tying the elite tier of schools to an arbitrary test that effectively perpetuates inequality. The complaint was filed by the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, LatinoJustice PRLDEF and the Center for Law and Social Justice at Medgar Evers College on behalf of a coalition of civil rights and community groups.”
“The backdrop to the legal controversy is a growing rebellion against high-stakes standardized tests, which some say perpetuate racial and socioeconomic equity in urban schools. The SHSAT is separate from the state’s standardized test system (which is designed to comply with federal education reforms), but, as a gatekeeper to educational opportunity, raises similar concerns.”

Click here for complete article